John L. Schwab

Profile

John Schwab is a litigator in the Los Angeles office of Munger, Tolles & Olson. His practice focuses on complex civil litigation, with an emphasis on intellectual property disputes and the entertainment industry. He maintains an active pro bono practice.

Mr. Schwab has significant litigation and trial experience. He has argued dispositive motions, examined and cross examined witnesses, taken and defended depositions, prepared experts for deposition and trial and drafted dispositive motions.

Representative Matters

  • Fox’s studio and network entities in contingent compensation disputes, brought by executives Barry Josephson and Kathleen Reichs and actors David Boreanaz and Emily Deschanel, that allege affiliate dealing and accounting claims concerning broadcast, new media, international exhibition and domestic syndication of the television show “Bones.”
  • Universal Music Group in a multi-district action consolidated before the federal court in Manhattan, alleging that the four major recorded music companies conspired to fix the price of music sold online in digital format.
  • Takeda Pharmaceuticals in obtaining a judgment of patent infringement and validity against three generic companies seeking to market a generic version of Takeda’s drug Dexilant®.

Mr. Schwab joined the firm after clerking for Judge Alex Kozinski of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. Mr. Schwab received his J.D. from Columbia Law School, where he was an articles editor of the Columbia Law Review. Prior to law school, Mr. Schwab worked as a network television writer on a wide variety of programs.

Publications

  • “Due Process and the ‘Worst of the Worst’: Mental Competence in Sexually Violent Predator Civil Commitment Proceedings,” 112 Colum. L. Rev. 912 (2012)
  • “Houston, We Have a Problem: Does the Second Amendment Create a Property Right to a Specific Firearm?,” 112 Colum. L. Rev. Sidebar 158 (2012, with Thomas G. Sprankling)
  • “Audiovisual Works and the Work for Hire Doctrine in the Internet Age,” 35 Colum. J. L. & Arts 141 (2011)

John Schwab is a litigator in the Los Angeles office of Munger, Tolles & Olson. His practice focuses on complex civil litigation, with an emphasis on intellectual property disputes and the entertainment industry. He maintains an active pro bono practice.

Mr. Schwab has significant litigation and trial experience. He has argued dispositive motions, examined and cross examined witnesses, taken and defended depositions, prepared experts for deposition and trial and drafted dispositive motions.

Representative Matters

  • Fox’s studio and network entities in contingent compensation disputes, brought by executives Barry Josephson and Kathleen Reichs and actors David Boreanaz and Emily Deschanel, that allege affiliate dealing and accounting claims concerning broadcast, new media, international exhibition and domestic syndication of the television show “Bones.”
  • Universal Music Group in a multi-district action consolidated before the federal court in Manhattan, alleging that the four major recorded music companies conspired to fix the price of music sold online in digital format.
  • Takeda Pharmaceuticals in obtaining a judgment of patent infringement and validity against three generic companies seeking to market a generic version of Takeda’s drug Dexilant®.

Mr. Schwab joined the firm after clerking for Judge Alex Kozinski of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. Mr. Schwab received his J.D. from Columbia Law School, where he was an articles editor of the Columbia Law Review. Prior to law school, Mr. Schwab worked as a network television writer on a wide variety of programs.

Publications

  • “Due Process and the ‘Worst of the Worst’: Mental Competence in Sexually Violent Predator Civil Commitment Proceedings,” 112 Colum. L. Rev. 912 (2012)
  • “Houston, We Have a Problem: Does the Second Amendment Create a Property Right to a Specific Firearm?,” 112 Colum. L. Rev. Sidebar 158 (2012, with Thomas G. Sprankling)
  • “Audiovisual Works and the Work for Hire Doctrine in the Internet Age,” 35 Colum. J. L. & Arts 141 (2011)