Allison M. Day

Profile

Allison Day is a litigator in the San Francisco office of Munger, Tolles & Olson. Ms. Day focuses her practice on complex civil litigation and has represented clients in a wide range of industries, including the banking, transportation and technology industries.

Prior to joining the firm, Ms. Day served as a law clerk to Judge Susan L. Carney of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and Judge Carol Bagley Amon of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York.

Ms. Day received her J.D. from Yale Law School, where she served as editor-in-chief of the Yale Journal of International Law, a Coker Fellow, and a member of the Supreme Court Advocacy Clinic. While at Yale, she authored Guiding Griswold: Reevaluating National Organizations’ Role in the Connecticut Birth Control Cases, 22 Cardozo J.L. & Gender 191 (2016), for which she recieved the Burton H. Brody prize for 2014-2015 for the best paper on constitutional privacy.

Before attending law school, Ms. Day received an M.A. in teaching and taught high school math in Washington, D.C., as part of the Teach for America program. 

Allison Day is a litigator in the San Francisco office of Munger, Tolles & Olson. Ms. Day focuses her practice on complex civil litigation and has represented clients in a wide range of industries, including the banking, transportation and technology industries.

Prior to joining the firm, Ms. Day served as a law clerk to Judge Susan L. Carney of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and Judge Carol Bagley Amon of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York.

Ms. Day received her J.D. from Yale Law School, where she served as editor-in-chief of the Yale Journal of International Law, a Coker Fellow, and a member of the Supreme Court Advocacy Clinic. While at Yale, she authored Guiding Griswold: Reevaluating National Organizations’ Role in the Connecticut Birth Control Cases, 22 Cardozo J.L. & Gender 191 (2016), for which she recieved the Burton H. Brody prize for 2014-2015 for the best paper on constitutional privacy.

Before attending law school, Ms. Day received an M.A. in teaching and taught high school math in Washington, D.C., as part of the Teach for America program.