Christopher M. Lynch

Profile

Christopher Lynch is a litigation associate in the Washington, D.C. office. His practice focuses on complex civil litigation, professional tort and fiduciary litigation, white collar defense and internal investigations, and appeals. He has conducted numerous internal investigations and False Claims Act matters in the health, education and defense sectors, and litigated cases through trial, appeal and discretionary review.

Mr. Lynch is a recipient of the 2018 CLAY (California Lawyer Attorney of the Year) Award for his pro bono appellate representation of a family of Los Angeles tenants establishing for the first time in a published opinion that California renters asserting a habitability defense have a right to a jury trial.

Key Representations

  • Motel 6 in a private class action and litigation adverse to the Washington State Attorney General regarding the provision of guest information to law enforcement.
  • International Finance Corporation in the United States Supreme Court case Jam v. International Finance Corporation, addressing the scope of the International Organizations Immunities Act.
  • Defense contractor in multi-agency criminal and civil government investigation into alleged fraud and False Claims Act violations.
  • Occidental Chemical Corporation in litigation arising out of the Bayou Corne Sinkhole in Assumption Parish, Louisiana.
  • University of California in obtaining a preliminary injunction shutting down a multi-million-dollar health care fraud scheme perpetrated by a network of doctors, pharmacies and recruiters targeting UC students for fraudulent clinical trials.
  • A major law firm in trial court and on appeal in litigation against allegations of aiding and abetting another lawyer’s breach of fiduciary duty.
  • LG Display in defense of class action and individual antitrust cases stemming from allegations of price-fixing among manufacturers of LCD panels.

Pro Bono

  • A group of former justice department officials in an amicus brief supporting the petitioner in Flowers v. Mississippi in the United States Supreme Court, arguing that racial discrimination in jury selection erodes public confidence in the justice system.
  • A pair of experienced death penalty attorneys in an amicus brief supporting petitioner Russell Bucklew in Bucklew v. Precythe in the United States Supreme Court, arguing that as-applied challenges to lethal injection procedures based on an individual inmate’s unique medical condition are an important, easily administrable vehicle that serve both the interests of the state and the interests of the inmate in avoiding botched executions.
  • Various parties concerned with the risk of official retaliation for First Amendment activities in an amicus brief in support of the respondent in Bartlett v. Nieves in the United States Supreme Court, arguing that a rule that probable cause alone can defeat a claim that an individual’s arrest was made in retaliation for First Amendment-protected activity would severely undermine freedom of expression.
  • A group of constitutional law scholars in an amicus brief in the Fifth Circuit supporting the appellees in Whole Woman’s Health v. Paxton, challenging the constitutionality of a Texas law banning the most common second trimester abortion procedure.
  • A group of constitutional law scholars in an amicus brief in the Fifth Circuit supporting the appellees in Whole Woman’s Health v. Smith, challenging the constitutionality of a Texas law governing the disposal of embryological and fetal remains from healthcare facilities after abortion or miscarriage.

Prior to joining Munger Tolles, Mr. Lynch served as a law clerk to Judge A. Wallace Tashima of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and Judge Alvin W. Thompson of the U.S. District Court for the District of Connecticut.

Mr. Lynch earned his J.D. from Yale Law School, where he was the reviews editor of the Yale Journal of Law and Feminism. Before entering law school, Mr. Lynch was a legal assistant at Covington & Burling LLP in New York and interned with Judge Denise L. Cote of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York.

He received his B.A. in architectural history and theory from Columbia College.
 

Christopher Lynch is a litigation associate in the Washington, D.C. office. His practice focuses on complex civil litigation, professional tort and fiduciary litigation, white collar defense and internal investigations, and appeals. He has conducted numerous internal investigations and False Claims Act matters in the health, education and defense sectors, and litigated cases through trial, appeal and discretionary review.

Mr. Lynch is a recipient of the 2018 CLAY (California Lawyer Attorney of the Year) Award for his pro bono appellate representation of a family of Los Angeles tenants establishing for the first time in a published opinion that California renters asserting a habitability defense have a right to a jury trial.

Key Representations

  • Motel 6 in a private class action and litigation adverse to the Washington State Attorney General regarding the provision of guest information to law enforcement.
  • International Finance Corporation in the United States Supreme Court case Jam v. International Finance Corporation, addressing the scope of the International Organizations Immunities Act.
  • Defense contractor in multi-agency criminal and civil government investigation into alleged fraud and False Claims Act violations.
  • Occidental Chemical Corporation in litigation arising out of the Bayou Corne Sinkhole in Assumption Parish, Louisiana.
  • University of California in obtaining a preliminary injunction shutting down a multi-million-dollar health care fraud scheme perpetrated by a network of doctors, pharmacies and recruiters targeting UC students for fraudulent clinical trials.
  • A major law firm in trial court and on appeal in litigation against allegations of aiding and abetting another lawyer’s breach of fiduciary duty.
  • LG Display in defense of class action and individual antitrust cases stemming from allegations of price-fixing among manufacturers of LCD panels.

Pro Bono

  • A group of former justice department officials in an amicus brief supporting the petitioner in Flowers v. Mississippi in the United States Supreme Court, arguing that racial discrimination in jury selection erodes public confidence in the justice system.
  • A pair of experienced death penalty attorneys in an amicus brief supporting petitioner Russell Bucklew in Bucklew v. Precythe in the United States Supreme Court, arguing that as-applied challenges to lethal injection procedures based on an individual inmate’s unique medical condition are an important, easily administrable vehicle that serve both the interests of the state and the interests of the inmate in avoiding botched executions.
  • Various parties concerned with the risk of official retaliation for First Amendment activities in an amicus brief in support of the respondent in Bartlett v. Nieves in the United States Supreme Court, arguing that a rule that probable cause alone can defeat a claim that an individual’s arrest was made in retaliation for First Amendment-protected activity would severely undermine freedom of expression.
  • A group of constitutional law scholars in an amicus brief in the Fifth Circuit supporting the appellees in Whole Woman’s Health v. Paxton, challenging the constitutionality of a Texas law banning the most common second trimester abortion procedure.
  • A group of constitutional law scholars in an amicus brief in the Fifth Circuit supporting the appellees in Whole Woman’s Health v. Smith, challenging the constitutionality of a Texas law governing the disposal of embryological and fetal remains from healthcare facilities after abortion or miscarriage.

Prior to joining Munger Tolles, Mr. Lynch served as a law clerk to Judge A. Wallace Tashima of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and Judge Alvin W. Thompson of the U.S. District Court for the District of Connecticut.

Mr. Lynch earned his J.D. from Yale Law School, where he was the reviews editor of the Yale Journal of Law and Feminism. Before entering law school, Mr. Lynch was a legal assistant at Covington & Burling LLP in New York and interned with Judge Denise L. Cote of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York.

He received his B.A. in architectural history and theory from Columbia College.